Tag Archives: hiking

Mirror Lake

Mirror Lake

A quick hike to a new location, Mirror Lake, with my long-time hiking partner, Sonia, was a welcome morning jaunt.  The trail was in good condition and there were many wildflowers on the hike including Monkey Flower, Larkspur, Foam Flower, Devil’s Club, Twisted Stalk, Bear Grass, Queen’s Cup, Bunchberry and some late Trillium.  At the end of the hike is a majestic lake with Tinkham Peak in the background.  A wonderful surprise awaits you if you venture further along the lake shore.

As we hiked back down we ran into a group of toddlers climbing up along with their parental ‘sherpas’.

Twin Lakes Hike

Twin Lakes Hike

When you live in the Pacific Northwest you really need to follow Miyamoto’s advice to go out when it’s sunny. So I heeded the master’s voice and took a quick hike up to Twin Lakes. It’s a relatively short hike of 6/10 of a mile and I cleared it in 17 minutes. There wasn’t anyone up there and the light was hitting the lake and its drainage creek just so right that it made me realize I had forgotten my camera. :(

The birds were quiet except for the always flitty juncos but the stationary wildflowers were much more compliant: Bunchberries, Columbine, Tiger Lily, Indian Paintbrush and Penstemon.

Coal Creek

Coal Creek

I found some time in the morning to do a quick hike to a popular trail in the Issaquah Alps.  There were a lot of families and youngsters about – glad to see them start young.

The trail was short (1.8 miles) with a 200 foot gain and I was surprised how quickly I completed it.  My pace was about 3.8 miles/hour.

Not many wildflowers but there were a lot of Pacific Slope Flycatchers calling.

Twin Falls

Twin Falls

I made my 2nd hike of the season to Twin Falls outside of Northbend. The trail is very well maintained, 2.25 miles roundtrip with an elevation gain of 500.  It took me about an hour to hike.

The trail was very green and lush with the forbidding oploplanax horridus loitering near the trail.  The wildflowers were few (dicentra formosa, geum macrophyllum) and the salmon berries were still not ripe despite the salmon berry bird (Swainson’s Thrush) singing all over the place.

A Dipper perched on one of the rocky outcrops of the falls and a Hairy Woodpecker played ‘peek-a-boo’ with me as I descended from the falls.